Expert advice

2018年06月27日 奧雅納
The Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) undoubtedly offers tremendous opportunities for countries along each of the corridors and for the countless organisation who will play a part in its progress. Yet the project also faces a number of issues that will be critical to the eventual success of the initiative, not least the challenge of social acceptance. For design and engineering firms such as Arup, it is easy to look at BRI as a series of large-scale infrastructure projects. In reality though, it is a multi-faceted development whose core principles cover everything from policy coordination and trade freedoms to financial integration and globalization. Ultimately, infrastructure is – always and everywhere – political. There are always strategic interests involved and there can be losers as well as winners. So even when the number of winners far outstrips the losers and there is a compelling case to build, we must always do our best for those who don’t see a critical new rail lin
2018年01月19日 奧雅納
Rail networks are an important part of the Belt and Road initiative to improve connectivity along the historical Silk Road trading routes, and stations are powerful catalysts for development and regeneration. How are transport hubs evolving to meet local needs? What can we learn from trends in Europe and North America? Malcolm Smith, Arup’s Global Masterplanning and Urban Design Leader shares his perspective.   Train stations were places of wonder in the 19th century. The buildings, like the trains within, symbolised technological progress and economic power. These ‘palaces’ of the industrial age were awe-inspiring in their sheer size, dramatic in architecture and feats of engineering. St Pancras Station in London was one such example and on its completion in 1868, was the largest enclosed space in the world. This has allowed it to be remodeled into today’s spectacular transport hub. © Hufton+Crow The redevelopment of King’s Cross station represents a co
2017年12月06日 奧雅納
Preparing for widespread growth Rapid growth in energy demand across Asia is seeing LNG become the fuel of choice. Driven by expanding populations, rising standards of living, and sprawling urbanisation, demand will only keep growing. With LNG production and transportation at an all-time high, Asia is seeing new opportunities for both land-based import terminals as well as floating storage and regasification facilities. This trend is set to keep on going, with energy growth predictions for Asia much higher than the rest of the world. Japan and Korea have long relied on LNG for energy security and power generation, but we’re now seeing a change across Asia. China, India, Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam and Bangladesh have followed suit with the recent introduction of gas into their import markets and are helping to drive demand across the region. As demand increases, new ways of bringing large-scale power generation online quickly needs to be found to meet thes
2017年10月18日 奧雅納
Sustainable and resilient infrastructure design is vital for the Belt & Road… not just for Asia, but for the world as well Just over four years after President Xi Jinping first launched his vision for the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), the concept is fast becoming a reality. With a vision of reform, development, trade and innovation at the heart of the concept, BRI is set to reshape and revitalise trade links around the globe. The countries along the various corridors account for some two-thirds of the world’s population, but only one third of the world’s GDP. So there is tremendous potential for growth. And the new infrastructure developed under the BRI banner will be the key to the unlocking this potential. That is not to say that some of this infrastructure would not be built without BRI, of course. In fact, the Asia Development Bank estimated that some US$1.7 trillion per annum would be required for infrastructure investment in Asia between 2016-2030 at current
2017年10月18日 奧雅納
Sustainable and resilient infrastructure design is vital for the Belt & Road… not just for Asia, but for the world as well Just over four years after President Xi Jinping first launched his vision for the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), the concept is fast becoming a reality. With a vision of reform, development, trade and innovation at the heart of the concept, BRI is set to reshape and revitalise trade links around the globe. The countries along the various corridors account for some two-thirds of the world’s population, but only one third of the world’s GDP. So there is tremendous potential for growth. And the new infrastructure developed under the BRI banner will be the key to the unlocking this potential. That is not to say that some of this infrastructure would not be built without BRI, of course. In fact, the Asia Development Bank estimated that some US$1.7 trillion per annum would be required for infrastructure investment in Asia between 2016-2030 at current
2017年12月06日 奧雅納
Preparing for widespread growth Rapid growth in energy demand across Asia is seeing LNG become the fuel of choice. Driven by expanding populations, rising standards of living, and sprawling urbanisation, demand will only keep growing. With LNG production and transportation at an all-time high, Asia is seeing new opportunities for both land-based import terminals as well as floating storage and regasification facilities. This trend is set to keep on going, with energy growth predictions for Asia much higher than the rest of the world. Japan and Korea have long relied on LNG for energy security and power generation, but we’re now seeing a change across Asia. China, India, Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam and Bangladesh have followed suit with the recent introduction of gas into their import markets and are helping to drive demand across the region. As demand increases, new ways of bringing large-scale power generation online quickly needs to be found to meet thes
2018年01月19日 奧雅納
Rail networks are an important part of the Belt and Road initiative to improve connectivity along the historical Silk Road trading routes, and stations are powerful catalysts for development and regeneration. How are transport hubs evolving to meet local needs? What can we learn from trends in Europe and North America? Malcolm Smith, Arup’s Global Masterplanning and Urban Design Leader shares his perspective.   Train stations were places of wonder in the 19th century. The buildings, like the trains within, symbolised technological progress and economic power. These ‘palaces’ of the industrial age were awe-inspiring in their sheer size, dramatic in architecture and feats of engineering. St Pancras Station in London was one such example and on its completion in 1868, was the largest enclosed space in the world. This has allowed it to be remodeled into today’s spectacular transport hub. © Hufton+Crow The redevelopment of King’s Cross station represents a co
2018年06月27日 奧雅納
The Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) undoubtedly offers tremendous opportunities for countries along each of the corridors and for the countless organisation who will play a part in its progress. Yet the project also faces a number of issues that will be critical to the eventual success of the initiative, not least the challenge of social acceptance. For design and engineering firms such as Arup, it is easy to look at BRI as a series of large-scale infrastructure projects. In reality though, it is a multi-faceted development whose core principles cover everything from policy coordination and trade freedoms to financial integration and globalization. Ultimately, infrastructure is – always and everywhere – political. There are always strategic interests involved and there can be losers as well as winners. So even when the number of winners far outstrips the losers and there is a compelling case to build, we must always do our best for those who don’t see a critical new rail lin