Expert advice

2019年07月10日 香港上海汇丰银行有限公司
Peter Wong, Deputy Chairman and Chief Executive, The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation Limited   Friction over trade between the world’s two largest economies naturally captures the attention of the business and investment community. The fact that cross-border trade within Asia is already much bigger than Asia’s exchange of goods and services with the U.S. or Europe makes fewer headlines, but is no less important.   It begs the question of what kind of networks, relationships and institutions will shape the future of international trade – and the answer to this question is beginning to emerge.   In partnership with China, which we expect to become the world’s biggest economy by 2030, a growing number of countries are rejecting economic isolation and beginning to work together to develop a new kind multilateralism.   While this process is in its infancy, I believe that a more collaborative approach to connecting economies tha
2019年05月24日 香港上海汇丰银行有限公司
15 May 2019   Policies targeting key priority areas have been instrumental in China’s economic transformation over the past 40 years, according to HSBC Group Chairman Mark Tucker.   Mr Tucker was speaking at the sixth annual HSBC China conference in Shenzhen – a city that embodies the impact of targeted policies. Shenzhen’s Special Economic Zone was first established in the 1980s to stimulate private-sector businesses. It has helped the city grow from a small fishing village into “a bustling metropolis…and the birthplace and home of China’s leading tech companies,” Mr Tucker said.   Other policies supporting the country’s continued development include opening up China’s capital markets, the Greater Bay Area and the Belt and Road Initiative, according to Mr Tucker.   The Greater Bay Area is designed to foster closer economic ties between Hong Kong, Macau and cities in mainland China including Guangzhou and Shenzhen. The Bel
2017年09月01日 香港上海汇丰银行有限公司
Peter Wong, Deputy Chairman and Chief Executive, The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation Limited In the wake of more isolationist political thinking in the West, with many developed economies turning inward, China is reaching out, seeking stronger trade and investment links with its economic partners. China’s Belt and Road initiative (BRI) is a prime example of this reaching out policy. Under the initiative, China aims to trigger demand for materials and goods at home by investing in strategic infrastructure projects abroad, growing economic ties along its old Silk Road to Europe and along newer maritime links in and around Asia and as far away as Africa, covering all potential points in-between. At its heart, the plan is to enhance global supply chains primarily through debt-financed infrastructure projects, across more than 60 countries. China expects annual trade with these countries to be worth US$ 2.5 trillion within a decade [1] – up from US$ 1 trillion in 2015
2017年07月21日 香港上海汇丰银行有限公司
By Gordon French, Head of Global Banking and Markets, Asia Pacific, HSBC Perhaps it’s inevitable that interest in China’s Belt and Road Initiative tends to revolve around the railway lines, ports and highways that will be constructed in its name. These are the most visible manifestations of the “Belt and Road,” and they evoke beguiling images of the ancient land and sea routes along which silk was once transported from Xi’An to St Petersburg, or tea from Guangzhou to Rotterdam. But sometimes it is the financial dimension of infrastructure in Asia that stands out – because of the sheer scale of what is required. The Asian Development Bank expects emerging Asia to need about US$26 trillion of infrastructure investment between 2016 and 2030. That amounts to US$1.7 trillion a year – and that’s just in Asia, while the Belt and Road encompass Africa and Europe as well. [1] Financing this colossal need for transport, telecoms and energy infrastructure across more t
2017年06月27日 香港上海汇丰银行有限公司
By Stuart Tait, Group General Manager and Regional Head of Commercial Banking, Asia Pacific With protectionism threatening to dim Europe’s economic lights, Southeast Asia – fuelled by its nation-building infrastructure activity - could be the commercial catalyst that European corporates need. --------- If a spending deficit of US$1.2 trillion in six key Asian economies and a rising tide of protectionist rhetoric in Europe don’t seem the most promising combination of business prospects, think again. Add in China’s ambitious Belt and Road Initiative, and together they make a compelling case of the potential for a multi-year boom in investment and construction that will create entirely new economic ecosystems. Belt and Road at its most basic is a strategy to build the transport links and logistics capacity to boost the flow of trade between China and more than 65 countries in Asia, the Middle East, Africa and Europe to an estimated US$2.5 trillion annually in the co
2017年05月15日 香港上海汇丰银行有限公司
王冬胜 香港上海汇丰银行有限公司副主席兼行政总裁   要真正理解国家「一带一路」战略,我们不能只着眼于基础建设,而应以更广阔的视野去看这个宏大的蓝图。 「一带一路」无疑涉及大量基础建设,例如高速公路、铁路、大桥等等,这些建设将促进中国与邻近国家,以至欧洲、非洲及中东国家的贸易。 「一带一路」借着促进国际货物和服务流通,推动区域贸易和合作。预料于未来十年,中国与沿线逾六十个国家的年贸易额将由2015年的约1万亿美元,跃升至超过2.5万亿美元。 现时环球贸易增长乏力,「一带一路」犹如一枝强心针,也符合国家致力推动人民币国际化,以及行之已久的鼓励中国企业「走出去」的政策。 「一带一路」不单关乎中国,对其他国家也将带来深远影响。庞大的基建投资对没有足够资金和技术自行发展�
2017年05月15日 香港上海汇丰银行有限公司
王冬胜 香港上海汇丰银行有限公司副主席兼行政总裁   要真正理解国家「一带一路」战略,我们不能只着眼于基础建设,而应以更广阔的视野去看这个宏大的蓝图。 「一带一路」无疑涉及大量基础建设,例如高速公路、铁路、大桥等等,这些建设将促进中国与邻近国家,以至欧洲、非洲及中东国家的贸易。 「一带一路」借着促进国际货物和服务流通,推动区域贸易和合作。预料于未来十年,中国与沿线逾六十个国家的年贸易额将由2015年的约1万亿美元,跃升至超过2.5万亿美元。 现时环球贸易增长乏力,「一带一路」犹如一枝强心针,也符合国家致力推动人民币国际化,以及行之已久的鼓励中国企业「走出去」的政策。 「一带一路」不单关乎中国,对其他国家也将带来深远影响。庞大的基建投资对没有足够资金和技术自行发展�
2017年06月27日 香港上海汇丰银行有限公司
By Stuart Tait, Group General Manager and Regional Head of Commercial Banking, Asia Pacific With protectionism threatening to dim Europe’s economic lights, Southeast Asia – fuelled by its nation-building infrastructure activity - could be the commercial catalyst that European corporates need. --------- If a spending deficit of US$1.2 trillion in six key Asian economies and a rising tide of protectionist rhetoric in Europe don’t seem the most promising combination of business prospects, think again. Add in China’s ambitious Belt and Road Initiative, and together they make a compelling case of the potential for a multi-year boom in investment and construction that will create entirely new economic ecosystems. Belt and Road at its most basic is a strategy to build the transport links and logistics capacity to boost the flow of trade between China and more than 65 countries in Asia, the Middle East, Africa and Europe to an estimated US$2.5 trillion annually in the co
2017年07月21日 香港上海汇丰银行有限公司
By Gordon French, Head of Global Banking and Markets, Asia Pacific, HSBC Perhaps it’s inevitable that interest in China’s Belt and Road Initiative tends to revolve around the railway lines, ports and highways that will be constructed in its name. These are the most visible manifestations of the “Belt and Road,” and they evoke beguiling images of the ancient land and sea routes along which silk was once transported from Xi’An to St Petersburg, or tea from Guangzhou to Rotterdam. But sometimes it is the financial dimension of infrastructure in Asia that stands out – because of the sheer scale of what is required. The Asian Development Bank expects emerging Asia to need about US$26 trillion of infrastructure investment between 2016 and 2030. That amounts to US$1.7 trillion a year – and that’s just in Asia, while the Belt and Road encompass Africa and Europe as well. [1] Financing this colossal need for transport, telecoms and energy infrastructure across more t
2017年09月01日 香港上海汇丰银行有限公司
Peter Wong, Deputy Chairman and Chief Executive, The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation Limited In the wake of more isolationist political thinking in the West, with many developed economies turning inward, China is reaching out, seeking stronger trade and investment links with its economic partners. China’s Belt and Road initiative (BRI) is a prime example of this reaching out policy. Under the initiative, China aims to trigger demand for materials and goods at home by investing in strategic infrastructure projects abroad, growing economic ties along its old Silk Road to Europe and along newer maritime links in and around Asia and as far away as Africa, covering all potential points in-between. At its heart, the plan is to enhance global supply chains primarily through debt-financed infrastructure projects, across more than 60 countries. China expects annual trade with these countries to be worth US$ 2.5 trillion within a decade [1] – up from US$ 1 trillion in 2015
2019年05月24日 香港上海汇丰银行有限公司
15 May 2019   Policies targeting key priority areas have been instrumental in China’s economic transformation over the past 40 years, according to HSBC Group Chairman Mark Tucker.   Mr Tucker was speaking at the sixth annual HSBC China conference in Shenzhen – a city that embodies the impact of targeted policies. Shenzhen’s Special Economic Zone was first established in the 1980s to stimulate private-sector businesses. It has helped the city grow from a small fishing village into “a bustling metropolis…and the birthplace and home of China’s leading tech companies,” Mr Tucker said.   Other policies supporting the country’s continued development include opening up China’s capital markets, the Greater Bay Area and the Belt and Road Initiative, according to Mr Tucker.   The Greater Bay Area is designed to foster closer economic ties between Hong Kong, Macau and cities in mainland China including Guangzhou and Shenzhen. The Bel
2019年07月10日 香港上海汇丰银行有限公司
Peter Wong, Deputy Chairman and Chief Executive, The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation Limited   Friction over trade between the world’s two largest economies naturally captures the attention of the business and investment community. The fact that cross-border trade within Asia is already much bigger than Asia’s exchange of goods and services with the U.S. or Europe makes fewer headlines, but is no less important.   It begs the question of what kind of networks, relationships and institutions will shape the future of international trade – and the answer to this question is beginning to emerge.   In partnership with China, which we expect to become the world’s biggest economy by 2030, a growing number of countries are rejecting economic isolation and beginning to work together to develop a new kind multilateralism.   While this process is in its infancy, I believe that a more collaborative approach to connecting economies tha